Blowsy

We are in “blowsy” time.  The fresh flowers of early summer are mostly over and we are looking out on a garden full of seeds, and deadheads.flower bedIt has been hot and sunny and windy, all of which have combined to give us that blown over feel.   loosestrifeThe grasses are long and wild.colours may be hot but grasses are wildIn sympathy with the season, yellows and golds predominate in the garden.flowers and golden fieldsgolden alchemilla mollisyellow and white flowersThere are just a few flowers left on the scattered poppy seedlings in the lane.poppies going over in laneAs the lilies go over …lillies go over… the sunflowers (finally) come out. sunflowersOut for walks, we find fluffy thistle seeds waiting to catch the breeze and depart …fluffy thistle seeds… and purple swathes of Rosebay Willowherb – such a beautiful name, such a beautiful plant and such beautiful colours here where it sits next to the russets of sorrel.Swathes of purple willowherbThe grain fields catch the mood of the moment with their golden moments.golden fields and golden flowersSometimes the skies do too.golden skiesWaiting time. We are waiting for harvest, for the next season.stitching away on summer daysMustn’t let this beautiful time go past without enjoying it to the full.

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kaydeerouge

Lost - and found.

10 thoughts on “Blowsy”

  1. Lovely. Feeling pretty blowsy myself.
    Seriously though, I love the end of summer. In Seattle, if you live for the Summer, you’ll become sad pretty quickly. I embrace the return of the rain, the chance to wear woolies, to stay indoors and knit or embroider. Summer is wonderful, its end is poignant, the return of cool weather, a blessing. The only thing I’m sad about this time of year is the young ones returning to school. My 12 year old would rather not…

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    1. One of the things I find most fascinating about the social media I use on the internet (instagram and this blog) is the immediate communication with people living in completely different time zones and much hotter and colder climes. What you say about Seattle summer and your longings for cooler weather – and knits and woollies and rain! – is so different from us in the UK. Nobody ever longs for rain here – even when we need it, we complain! Fascinating world……..your poor 12 year old, I extend my sympathies:-(

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  2. I agree with frithany, I’m just the next state over and I cannot wait for cold weather, we are literally burning up 😦 For some reason or other I love dried (dead ?) flowers and seed heads. My mother always had dried flower arrangements in the house and fresh ones outside. Pictures are beautiful as always. Thank you.

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    1. I’ve read about your hot, hot days, Susan, so I can well understand how – like frithany -you long for the end of the summer heat. I’ve lived in very hot countries (Iran, Japan, Belgrade) – so I know how unpleasant scorching heat can be – especially with high humidity. Do you have that? As I said above – just fascinating thinking how different these places we live in are – and yet with the internet we have instant communication. Shrinking the world!!

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  3. I agree with Susan, the photographs are splendid. They capture that funny golden light of nostalgia at the end of summer and early autumn. I wish you all the comfort of the remaining light before the long dark of winter.

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    1. Following on from my replies above, Rebecca, when I hear from you, I think of how extraordinary it is that you are in early spring – and from all accounts, Melbourne has had a pretty nasty winter. As we go down into the dark, short days (oh dear – you can hear my sinking heart) – you come up to hot, hot summers!

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  4. What a lovely, poignant, fleeting-like-the-thistles post. I specially liked the sun-struck field and then the golden sky. Also your blue thumbnail in harmony with the blue sky! (Was it planned?)

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    1. I hadn’t noticed that my blue thumbnail matched the sky until you pointed it out! The golds in sky and fields and flowers and grain were just magical – all gone now (as I write well into September) – as you so beautifully put it “fleeting-like-the-thistles”.

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