Let me introduce you to Poe

Poe in Crediton garden, hiding behind nasturtium plantPoe and her sister Monet came to live with us in our Crediton home in 1999.    Monet and Poe as kittens, sitting on old knitting machineThey were sweet little kittens, and we loved them ……Young Monet and Poe cuddled up to each other while Poe washes Monetand they loved each other too.Monet and Poe cuddled up to each otherBut that love did not last.  Before long, they preferred to keep an unfriendly distance from each other.Poe and Monet on benchMonet was an anxious cat, and had some very difficult problems so eventually she had to leave us for the great cat home in the sky.  RIP Monet.Monet lying in the sunCuriously, with Monet’s departure Poe found her voice.Poe making her voice heardWe weren’t at all sure how Poe would take to our move from balmy Devon to the windy open spaces of Northumberland.Poe on garden fence looking out to the seaShe loved it! – and took to mousing with such enthusiasm that even when the snows came she was out there, catching mice.Poe outside with mouseShe liked to bring the mice in to play with – but often lost them so they ran off to make new homes inside.Poe inside with mouseRecently high blood pressure caused her retinas to detach and she went completely blind over night.  Luckily medication (very expensive!) means that she can now see again.Poe's damaged eyes after collapsed retinasThese are a few of her favourite things …
hogging the best spot in front of the fire…Poe in front of firedrinking Jammy’s cereal milk ….Poe watching Jammy eat cereallying in the sun…….Poe in woolly room sunlightdoing the fence walk with you know who ….Poe doing fence walkrolling around in a smelly man’s shirt……..Poe smelling Jam's smelly shirtwatching bird tv (broadcast live from our woodshed)!……Poe watching Bird tvand her Christmas mouse! Poe and her Christmas mouseOh Poe – we love you!

The Museum of Scotland

I spent yesterday morning at Edinburgh’s Museum of Scotland –  very definitely my very favourite museum!

You walk into this huge light-filled space, and are drawn to look upwards.  You just have to gasp at the inventiveness and glory of it all.glass roof of museum of scotlandClimb up to the top floor, look down – and – it’s still amazing!looking down on ground floor of museum of scotlandOn the way up and down you will pass all manner of extraordinary things.looking over to upper galleries in museum of scotlandThe original museum was  designed by Francis Fowke ( who also designed parts of London’s Victoria & Albert Museum and the Natural History Museum).  It opened in 1866.

There was a major redevelopment here between 2006 and 2011.  The curators took the opportunity to impress their 21st century take on the building and its collections.  This is what gives the fine old building its remarkable character.

Looking down into the well space,  you will see the light chamber of a lighthouse.light chamber from lighthouseGlance over at the far wall and there’s the jaw of a whale, pottery, metalwork.extraordinary collection of things in the museum of scotlandIt’s the serendipity, the juxtaposition of such extraordinarily unrelated objects that works so well here.  It reminds me of another favourite museum of mine, the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford.

There are extraordinary bicycles,bicycle for fourSigns from old railway stations,old railway station signsCurious sea-creatures in glass jars,sea-creatures in glass jarsFantastic tea-pots – and lots lots more!teapots in museum of ScotlandOf course, these are only meant as tasters for what’s in the rest of the collections, in the rooms behind.  I saw far too many fascinating things to list them all here, so I will just mention two exhibits that I regularly visit.

These are some of the 17 miniature pine coffins, each containing a small dressed doll, found on Arthur’s Seat in 1836.  Nobody knows who made them or for what reason – lots of speculation.  They have obviously been made with great care.  I find them sad, and slightly disturbing – but so intriguing!Arthur's seat coffinsMy other choice couldn’t be more different – for a start it’s one of the largest items in the museum whereas the miniature dolls must be some of the tiniest exhibits. Newcomen engineThis is a rare surviving example of an atmospheric or Newcomen engine.  It was used to pump water from the coal mines at Caprington colliery until 1901 – and it still works!  It moves slowly and regularly and reassuringly – just as it must have been for those 19th century miners.  It is a magnificent beast, and I am drawn to it by its size and power and efficacy.

So, thank you very much, Museum of Scotland, for a wonderful morning’s entertainment and exploration.  I’ll be back for more before too long!

(Oh – and we had a delicious lunch in the basement Museum Brasserie too.)

Windy, windy, windy-blow! *

We’ve just embarked on a period of real winter storms.

They started yesterday, gathering  full momentum over the evening and night.  By the time we went to bed just before midnight, they were into full rampaging mode.  I lay awake and marvelled at the sound.  Yet, curiously, when I woke in the early hours, the storms had completely abated – no sound at all.

But they are back now.

Our house sits on an east-west axis; to the north lie the old steading courtyard and more buildings; to the south are the open fields, sea and the view down the coast to Lindisfarne.View from our garden to the castles and seaWe are protected from the brunt of the nasty cold Northerlies, North-easterlies and North-westerlies by the rest of the steading buildings.  Westerlies stream along the length of our house and are funnelled by the shape of the buildings out to sea.

It is the dirt-laden, shifty Southerlies that we hate most.  They blast over the flat coastal lands before the house, and slam into our buildings.  You might think they would be balmy, warm and good-natured (and of course some are), but most are edgy and difficult.  Our windows are grimy from the Saharan dust they carry.  And if they are really boisterous and bad-tempered, the gusts will slam down our chimney and can put out a blazing fire with one casual puff.

Right now the winds are all over the place.  The only common factor is that they are powerful.  They find out every little nook and cranny and we are cold, cold, cold.  I sit typing looking just like a comfy old rotund teddy-bear because I have so many layers of clothing on.

Our bedroom is right under the eaves so bedtime when the winds blow does not mean peace and quiet!  In fact it can be blowing a gale and we are hardly aware of it. At other times the slates rattle persistently. It all depends on the wind direction. It seems to be when the wind strikes the roof obliquely rather than sideways on or straight at it.

Last night we went to bed with 40mph winds and it was hard to get to sleep with all the rattling. By morning the wind had not abated but had swung round further to the north and we were hardly aware of it.Sloping bedroom roof right under the eavesWhen we first arrived here, – indeed our first night here! – a storm blew up, and the winds lashed against the roof.  I lay in bed and thought how mad we had been to come to this dreadful, frightening place.  Now I lie in bed and marvel at the sound.  Often the winds just grumble round the roof.  Nights when they complain like last are extraordinary – and to be wondered at.

Not that I always think that.  I have discovered that I can take about 3 days of windy noise, and then I have had enough.  Please please oh go away oh noisy wind.

For the moment the thing is to keep warm and busy.

*technical term of Stephen’s

Busy old fool, unruly Sun

Sun right behind Bamburgh castleIt’s now 18 days since the winter solstice, and although each day that passes lifts my spirits as the minutes of daylight increase, there’s an accompanying sadness.

We are losing our sunrise.

Our house looks south,  out over the North Sea coast,  so on a good day we clearly see the castles of Lindisfarne and Bamburgh.View of Lindisfarne and Bamburgh castlesNo view of sunrise, you would think.  But that’s where you’re wrong.  Until I came to live here some 4 years ago, I hadn’t realised that because of the tilt of the earth, during the winter months sunrise moves over across the eastern horizon towards the south.

Imagine our excitement the first winter we were here in 2010 to see this magnificent sunrise exploding over the snowy fields.  At this point  sunrise has moved to half way between the two castles.Sunrise over snow between Lindisfarne and Bamburgh castlesA more furious sunrise here; now the sunrise has moved right up to Bamburgh Castle and you can just make out the silhouette of the castle with the sun rising behind.more furious sunrise behind Bamburgh castleChristmas Eve last year, just a few days after the solstice, and the sunrise is far past Bamburgh Castle.  But it’s started out on its journey back.sun starting return journey to Bamburgh castleOh, busy old fool – teasing us with all that promise  ….sunrise - teasing us with all that promiseto when you make your cosy little egg yolk first appearance ……sun making first little egg yolk appearanceto playing mean and moody………mean and moody sunrise over snowto coquettish, mysterious ………Sun looking coquettish beyond Bamburghto simply gorgeous ……simply gorgeous sunriseI don’t want you to go –  I shall miss you!